Interesting Article about God and Science

consciousIf you have a technical mind and enjoy science, this is an interesting article that discusses how science is biased against the concept of consciousness, spirituality, etc, and how that bias leads to an incomplete understanding of our Universe.  The writer does not claim to be a Christian, but explains how an honest view of our Universe requires the existence of a Creator.

It is not a Bible study and thus is not theologically correct, but it is an interesting piece that will engage your mind and help you be prepared to discuss the issue of God and Creation with others.

Let me know what you think.

http://www.naturalnews.com/036376_Higgs_boson_conscious_cosmology.html

Biblical Goals for the New Year

GOAL DICTIONARYFor all our days are passed away in thy wrath: we spend our years as a tale that is told. The days of our years are threescore years and ten; and if by reason of strength they be fourscore years, yet is their strength labour and sorrow; for it is soon cut off, and we fly away. Who knoweth the power of thine anger? even according to thy fear, so is thy wrath. So teach us to number our days, that we may apply our hearts unto wisdom.

(Psalms 90:9-12)

Time was designed by God as a tool for man to number his days and apply his heart unto wisdom.  If we do not pay attention, life will pass us by so quickly that we waste it and lose our opportunity to make a significant difference in the world.  Time has built-in checkpoints to remind us to pay attention to where we are and where we are going.  We call them minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years, etc.  The New year is a great time to reevaluate our lives.  Below is a list of Biblical Goals for the New Year as given in a sermon at Curtis Corner Baptist Church.  You can listen to the sermon here for details on each point.

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Refreshing honesty from an Evangelical about Fundamental Christians

Refreshing Honesty

I do not know the man who wrote the following article.  I have never read any of his books or sermons and as such do not recommend anything else he has produced.  There is more good material produced by Fundamental brethren than I will read in a lifetime.  However, I do appreciate his honesty in the following column.  An outspoken article such as this will not win him any favor with his constituents and took courage to write. I am thankful for his candor and sincerity.

May our fundamental churches heed this warning from one who is on the other side trying to deal with the significant problems that result from compromise. Let no more Bible-believing churches fall for the empty promises of concession.  The Bible and it’s doctrine are not ours to do with as we please, but belong to God who has given us the sacred trust of teaching and preaching it without error.  May we be faithful in that commission and shine His light brightly to the world with the beauty of a holy life!

Our Fundamentalist Betters

    by R.C. Sproul, Jr.

As I write, I find myself visiting Gwinnett County, Georgia. It’s a good thing that I am only visiting. If I actually lived here, I’d find myself on the wrong side of the law. It seems the county recently passed a law that says you may not have more than eight people living in a single house at a time. Me, my wife, and my seven children puts us over the limit. The law, I’m pretty sure, wasn’t designed to keep families like mine out of the county. That wasn’t the express intent of the county commissioners. Instead, I believe the intent, though this too wasn’t expressed, was to discourage certain immigrant groups from settling here. Rather than pass a law against those immigrant groups, which wouldn’t be politically correct, they came up with their clumsy solution that also affects large families. This particular law has run smack into another law, the law of unintended consequences. Such always happens when we try an end-around around honesty. When we try to have our way, while hiding our convictions, we lose everything we seek.

It is no new insight to note that in America the evangelical church is worldly and anemic. We are so earthly minded that we are no heavenly good. The anemia comes from the worldliness. But whence comes the worldliness? Like any other sin, we have options for placing its advent. We could argue that it began with the latest fad to hit the church. Or we could go back to the beginning, to the garden. Both have their advantages. It might be more helpful, however, to see the beginning of this descent at the height of the fundamentalist-modernist controversy.

Fundamentalism is so named for a fundamental reason. It was a movement that concerned itself with affirming, defending, and maintaining the fundamentals of the faith. As a movement, it affirmed the authority of the Bible. It affirmed the accounts therein of creation, of miracles, of the virgin birth, of the death and resurrection of Jesus. It affirmed the necessity of conversion through faith in the finished work of Christ. It affirmed, in short, the defining issues of historical evangelicalism. Why, then, isn’t the controversy called “the evangelical-modernist” controversy? To get at that answer we must ask another. What is it that distinguishes evangelicals and fundamentalists? Suddenly our problem becomes clear. An evangelical is a fundamentalist that wants the respect of modernists, and sells his soul to get it.

That is to say, the difference between a fundamentalist and an evangelical isn’t the content of their respective beliefs, but the way in which those beliefs are held. Fundamentalists, to their credit, clung to the fundamentals like a pit bull on a t-bone. There was nothing attractive or sophisticated about it, but everyone knew you’d never tear the two apart. The evangelical, on the other hand, sought to find, at least culturally, a middle ground. Yes, we believe in the authority of the Bible, but we believe it for nice, professional, academic reasons. Indeed, all that we believe we believe for nice, professional, academic reasons. What separates evangelicals from fundamentalists is that we evangelicals don’t breathe fire, and we have fancy degrees hanging in our studies, instead of pictures of Billy Sunday. We evangelicals are they who cut this deal with the modernists, “We will call you brother, if you will call us scholar.”

Please don’t misunderstand. The point isn’t that the right way to believe in the fundamentals is to be stupid. Instead, the point is that the right way to believe in the fundamentals is with a holy indifference to what others think about us. Anything less leads us right where we are. That is, any movement that begins with a fear of those we are seeking to win has already been won by those that are feared. We thought we were defending the fundamentals, but we were giving away the store. Like the Gwinnett county officials, our failure to demonstrate the courage of our convictions led to exactly what we didn’t want. Weakness disguised as compromise compromised our convictions, and exposed our weakness. Because we were too worldly to not care, we have become too worldly to matter.

We still follow that same path today. For fear of offending the lost, we will not tell them they are lost. For fear of looking narrow and close-minded, we have made peace not just with the deadly secularism of modernism, but with the doubly deadly folly of postmodernism. There the culture itself reflects our uncertainty, refusing to make affirmations, just like us. In our pride we have embraced a humility that won’t stand for anything.

Our Shepherd, however, calls us to a different path. He tells us that having those outside the faith revile us for our faith is something to be sought, not something to be avoided, that those who experience the disdain of the world for His name’s sake are blessed. The fundamentalists of the last century were laughed at and scorned. And for that they earned the praise of Jesus. May we find the courage not only to affirm the fundamentals, but may we be given a double portion of the spirit of the fundamentalists. They fought the good fight, while we collaborated. They kept the faith, while we merely kept our positions in our communities. May we learn to fear no man, and to fear God. For such is the beginning of wisdom.

Welcome!

Welcome to PaulEChapman.com!

I believe the Lord directed me to start this site to instruct, equip and encourage God’s people.  It should be our desire to consistently obey God’s Word in our daily lives. I am well aware of the battle between the Spirit and the flesh that every believer must fight daily.  It is imperative that we walk in the Spirit and not fulfill the lusts of the flesh. The stakes are high.  We are the only Bible some will ever read.

II Corinthians 3:2-3 “Ye are our epistle written in our hearts, known and read of all men: Forasmuch as ye are manifestly declared to be the epistle of Christ ministered by us, written not with ink, but with the Spirit of the living God; not in tables of stone, but in fleshy tables of the heart.”

“Ye are our epistle…”

Each child of God must realize the impact they have on the world around them.  Those around us will make judgments about our God according to what they see in us.  I pray that what they see will be glorifying to our heavenly Father.

Is your testimony powerful & consistent?  It should be.  Does your life unashamedly point people to Christ and His Word?  It can.  Let’s start today.  Will you partner with me? Let’s encourage one another as we press on toward the mark of our high calling in Christ Jesus.  It is my prayer that our gracious God will use this site to help you and I make an eternal difference in our world!

God is worthy of praise and the whole world should know of His glory.